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Our JEDI Communities of Practice provide brave spaces for ENGO staff to share experiences, resources, and best practices to foster BIPOC-welcoming and affirming workplaces. In Fall 2024, members of the ENGO sector can choose from one of two streams: BIPOC Inclusion Cafe: Laying the Foundations, or BIPOC Inclusion Lab: Fostering Transformational Change. Each stream consists of six two-hour sessions held bi-weekly via Zoom. 

To provide an intimate experience that fosters meaningful engagement, each stream is limited to a maximum of 15 participants. These streams are not passive experiences. Expect to actively lean in and participate by sharing your organizational experiences and resources with your peers in a collegial environment devoted to unlearning and grounded in empathy.

Our JEDI Communities of Practice offer ENGO staff the opportunity to:

  • Discuss the joys and challenges of BIPOC inclusion in an intimate, virtual space with your peers who are at a similar stage of their organizational JEDI journey
  • Learn from occasional ENGO-sector Fireside Chat guest speakers who have experience initiating and maintaining BIPOC inclusion initiatives in their organizations
  • Work through challenging, real-life scenarios in small breakout groups  
  • Share and receive resources, templates, policies, strategies, and best practices related to BIPOC inclusion 
  • Build community, strengthen relationships with your ENGO peers, and become part of our JEDI Alumni Network to keep up the learning momentum and retain access to a strong peer network

How to choose your stream:
ENGO staff can self-select from the two streams based on their level of organizational experience with JEDI initiatives that focus on BIPOC inclusion.

BIPOC Inclusion Cafe: Laying the Foundations is designed for organizations that are in the early stages of BIPOC inclusion. If your organization wants to create or improve foundational elements such as writing JEDI statements, forming a JEDI Committee, creating an organizational JEDI plan, or even discussing if JEDI is the right acronym for your organization, this is the stream for you. The Cafe will focus more on lecture-style instruction to support foundation building with some opportunities for participants to share experiences and resources in breakout groups and full group activities.

BIPOC Inclusion Lab: Fostering Transformational Change is designed for organizations who have already laid the foundations of BIPOC inclusion and are ready to roll up their sleeves to deepen the work, explore strategies specific to policies, processes, and culture, and discuss how to use BIPOC inclusion principles to bring a transformative lens to their organizations. If your organization wants to explore how to meaningfully integrate JEDI initiatives into strategic plans, programs, and learn how to build authentic relationships with equity-deserving communities at the speed of trust, this is the stream for you. The Lab will focus more on peer-sharing, discussions, and concrete resource and strategy-sharing to help organizations deepen their work in this area, with limited lecture-style instruction. Participants are expected to lean in by actively sharing organizational experiences and resources with each other.

BIPOC Inclusion Café: Laying the Foundations

Thursdays, September 19, October 3, October 17, October 31, November 14, November 28 (1 pm - 3 pm EST)

Session 1: Psychological Safety & Privilege

This initial session is focussed on building trust and safety in the group and getting to know each other. We will introduce the concept of psychological safety, discuss why it is essential to organizational BIPOC inclusion initiatives, and explore how colonization factors in. We will practice identifying and coming to terms with our own privileges, and how those relate to psychological safety. 

Session 2: Assessing Resources & Impact

Before diving into BIPOC inclusion initiatives, many organizations don’t stop to assess what staff time and financial resources they can realistically devote to such initiatives. We will explore your organization’s BIPOC inclusion “why”, and how to set your organization up for success by setting realistic goals based on resource capacity.

Session 3: Forming an Intersectional JEDI Committee

Forming an official JEDI Committee can take your organization’s BIPOC inclusion efforts to the next level. We will discuss considerations for committee membership, guidelines and scope options, and how the committee can best communicate with and integrate the work of other areas of the organization.

Session 4: Exploring External JEDI Statements & Internal JEDI Plans

While ENGOs often start with external-facing JEDI statements, true change comes from within. We will discuss considerations for creating internal JEDI plans, how they may inform external JEDI statements, and why to consider documenting your organization’s journey.

Session 5: Getting Organizational Buy-In

Creating BIPOC inclusion foundations also means making the case to your colleagues, leadership, and Board for why BIPOC inclusion is important. We will discuss organizational benefits, effective strategies, and how to counter common arguments against implementing BIPOC inclusion initiatives.

Session 6: From Foundational Learning to Organizational Action

In the final session, we bring everything together with a solid work plan designed to set you up for success to take your foundational learnings back to your organization, and discuss potential organizational changes to lay or strengthen your foundation for BIPOC inclusion.

Cost: $100

Registrants will be granted access to course materials and recordings for 60 days after each session. 

Apply Now

BIPOC Inclusion Lab: Fostering Transformational Change

Thursdays, September 26, October 10, October 24, November 7, November 21, December 5 (1 pm - 3 pm EST)

Session 1:  Psychological Safety & Intersectionality

This initial session is focussed on building trust and safety in the group and getting to know each other. We will take an in-depth look at the concept of psychological safety, discuss why it is essential to organizational BIPOC inclusion initiatives, and explore how intersectionality factors in. 

Session 2: White Privilege, Guilt, & Fragility

Colonization has created a world in which White/European people hold the most privilege. This has significant impacts on BIPOC inclusion in the workplace. We will explore how White privilege can lead to guilt and fragility, as well as identifying and coming to terms with our own privileges across a range of dimensions.

Session 3: Mapping & Sharing Power

BIPOC inclusion isn’t only about diversifying staff – it's also about fostering workplaces where BIPOC staff have real power. We will discuss how to map power flows, how power is shared (and with who), and explore best practices for democratizing power in your organization.

Session 4: Allyship, Mentorship, & Sponsorship

Mentorship may get all the attention, but it can only do so much on its own. We will discuss the differences between these three terms, best mentorship practices, and the many benefits of  allyship and sponsorship to BIPOC staff, and the whole organization.

Session 5: Fostering Cultures of Care

In ENGO workplace culture, staff are typically expected to go above and beyond due to their dedication to “the cause”. This approach increases the risk of burnout for everyone, but has special impacts on BIPOC staff. We will discuss the concept of organizational cultures of care, explore different caring strategies and impacts, and identify how to integrate care into all aspects of organizational culture. 

Session 6: From Learning to Organizational Transformation

In the final session, we bring everything together with a solid work plan designed to set you up for success to take your learnings back to your organization, and discuss how to drive transformative change via BIPOC inclusion.

Cost: $100

Registrants will be granted access to course materials and recordings for 60 days after each session. 

Apply Now

Our Instructor: Anna-Liza Badaloo

Viewing JEDI (Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion) through the lens of empathy, her decolonized, intersectional approach has helped organizations build capacity by implementing JEDI-focused training, events, communities of practice, peer networks, and advocacy campaigns. By centering underserved communities including BIPOC, youth, and 2SLGBTQIA+, she helps organizations understand how colonial structures impact organizational health

How to Apply

To provide the best peer-sharing and relationship-building experience, each stream is limited to 15 people. We are accepting applications for both streams until August 9, 2024 (or earlier if we reach application capacity), and we expect to confirm participants by mid-August 2024. Please contact Anna-Liza Badaloo (anna-liza@sustainabilitynetwork.ca) for the Application Form or any questions. 

How to choose your stream:
ENGO representatives may self-select from the three workshop tracks based on their previous learning experiences with decolonization content.

Introduction to Decolonization in the ENGO Sector is designed for first-time learners and those with limited comfort exploring the Session topics. Sessions will be lecture-style making limited space for group discussion. Breakout rooms will be used intermittently to encourage first-time learners to practice discussing topics and gain confident understanding of materials.

Advanced Decolonial Theory and Application is designed for ENGO representatives who have experience with session topics and are ready to take chances by participating in potentially uncomfortable conversations to expose the root issues at play. These spaces are designed with safety of participants in mind with the goal of exposing the potential reproduction of colonial thinking/doing within the ENGO sector. Sessions will be conversational while making use of lecture-style teaching.

For Indigenous Ears Only - A Space for Reflection and Action is designed for Indigenous people who work within the ENGO sector and seek to connect with others to discuss experiences and vision decolonial pathways forward. These session agendas will be co-developed with participants.
Register Intro

Introduction to Decolonization in the ENGO Sector

Thursdays, October 3, 10, 17, 24 (1-3:00 pm EST)

Session 1: Settler Colonialism 101

Introduce ENGO representatives to the fact that colonization is a structure and not an event. Identifies key ways that colonialism moves through individuals and organizations.

Session 2: Positionality

ENGO representatives learn how to articulate their social location within a settler colonial state, and in relation to potential Indigenous partners.

Session 3: Inherent Indigenous Governance 101

Introduce the fact that Indigenous nations have their own sources of political authority that they can (and do) draw on when addressing environmental issues. Examples provided.

Session 4: Building Better Relations

ENGO representatives will road test ways they can implement previous workshop key points to re-imagine partnerships with Indigenous nations.

Cost: $100 (or register 4 staff from the same organization for one stream and get the 5th registration free)

All registrants will be provided with a link to access the recordings and presentation slides for 60 days following each session.

Instructor:

Dr. Les Sabiston (Red River Métis) is from Aswahonanihk (Selkirk), Manitoba. Working at the intersections of political, legal, and medical anthropologies, as well as Indigenous Studies, Les’ work brings together critical social theories of colonialism, race, class, gender and sexuality with the political commitments of decolonization and aspirations of realizing alternative worlds informed by Indigenous futures. A guiding principle to his work has been to develop a more robust understanding of the ongoing process of encounter with Indigenous peoples in Canada, that is, how the state and its people interact with and understand themselves in relation to the original peoples of this land.

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Register Advanced

Advanced Decolonial Theory and Application

Wednesdays, October 16, 23, 30, November 6 (1-3 pm EST)

Session 1:  Diagnosing Settler Colonialism in the Enviro Sector

Participants will be asked to share ways in which they have diagnosed and traced power in social justice movements and/or in the ENGO sector. This workshop will make space for discomfort as part of promoting decolonization.

Session 2: Inherent Indigenous Governance

A mix of advanced and introductory theory, this workshop delves into legal and political pluralism, naming the fact that Indigenous nations have their own sources of political authority that they can (and do) draw on when addressing environmental issues.

Session 3: The Nonprofit Industrial Complex

ENGO participants are introduced to theories and examples describing the Nonprofit Industrial Complex and the “Shadow State.” Purpose is to show how settler colonialism structures civil society.

Session 4: Decolonizing ENGO-First Nation Partnerships

This workshop delves deep into how ENGOs can partner with Indigenous nations beyond the Nonprofit Industrial Complex while promoting deference to inherent Indigenous political leaders.

Cost: $100 (or register 4 staff from the same organization for one stream and get the 5th registration free)

All registrants will be provided with a link to access the recordings and presentation slides for 60 days following each session.

Instructor:

Dr. Damien Lee is a member of Fort William First Nation and holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies from the University of Manitoba, and a Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance from the University of Victoria. Dr. Lee has extensive experience facilitating/teaching adult-focused education at the post-secondary level and co-leads Gimiwan Research and Consulting. They serve mainly Indigenous communities and Indigenous-led organizations by providing research and workshop services based in decolonial ethics and Indigenous worldviews.
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Register IEO

For Indigenous Ears Only - A Space for Reflection and Action

Tuesdays, October 22, 29, November 5, 12 (1-3 pm EST)

The Indigenous only space will be collaborative in nature but critical in approach. This track is a space for Indigenous folks within the ENGO sector to come together to discuss their experiences and work, with an eye to taking a position on what the sector might need to do in order to promote decolonization. Participants will use the first session to define our goals for the remaining three meetings. Therefore, session topics named here are proposals only.

Session 1:  Naming the Cannibal: Settler Colonialism in the ENGO Sector

Session 2: Proposed topic: Reflections on working in the ENGO Sector

Session 3: Proposed topic: Centering Indigenous Thought in the ENGO Sector

Session 4: Proposed topic: Visioning a Decolonial Environmental Sector

Cost: Free

Instructor:

Dr. Damien Lee is a member of Fort William First Nation and holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies from the University of Manitoba, and a Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance from the University of Victoria. Dr. Lee has extensive experience facilitating/teaching adult-focused education at the post-secondary level and co-leads Gimiwan Research and Consulting. They serve mainly Indigenous communities and Indigenous-led organizations by providing research and workshop services based in decolonial ethics and Indigenous worldviews.
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