Register

4-Part Series

September 24, October 1, 8, & 15, 1:00-2:30 PM ET on Zoom Meeting (camera and audio enabled)
Cost:
$75 for the series

*All registrants will be provided with a link to the recording and presentation slides following each session. The recording will be available for 60 days.


This workshop hones in on the impact of generational gaps within leadership, emphasizing the need to bridge these divides. By enhancing conflict resolution skills and fostering a deeper understanding of intergenerational dynamics, participants will gain valuable tools for maintaining a cohesive and effective workplace environment.

Part I: Bringing Your Generation to Work
September 24, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

In the kickoff session, participants will focus inward to identify their own strengths and weaknesses as part of a multigenerational team. They will learn about the dangers inherent in workplace ageism (i.e., intergenerational tension) and review trends in each generation's communication style, preferences, and - perhaps most importantly - perceptions of others' style and preferences. They will begin building an awareness of their own prejudices, preferences, and habits in communicating with different generations. Attendees will continue their self-awareness journey with a diagnostic exercise aimed at uncovering their own generational biases and identifying opportunities for positive change. Finally, participants will begin the process of identifying potential or actual intergenerational roadblocks to mission fulfillment within their organization and the behaviors involved in those roadblocks.

Part II: Assembling & Working on Successful Intergenerational Teams
October 1, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

In the second session, attendees will focus outward to evaluate their team's or department's strengths and weaknesses. They will take a deep dive into each generation's common influences and the historical components that shaped their approach to workplace communication. They will also examine the professional strengths and opportunities commonly attributed to each generation and learn how to identify them (or their absence) among existing team members. They will be introduced to common sources of friction among different generations and learn strategies to avoid, minimize, or eliminate those sources while reaching a mutually inclusive conclusion. Finally, participants will begin the process of tying organizational goals and mission activity to individual staff talent and taking steps to ensure the best possible team is assembled.

Part III: Mastering Intergenerational Leadership
October 8, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

In Part III, participants (regardless of position/title) will take a bird's-eye view of their organization or department to begin identifying and understanding the origins of multigenerational communications- related pitfalls. They will be introduced to the process of codifying a departmental or organizational communications policy based on consensus, mission centrism, and mutual respect, and observe how generational differences come into play in even the simplest daily interaction. Attendees will engage in multiple activities to learn how to tailor their leadership style not only to different generations, but also to individuals and to scenarios common in the nonprofit world. Finally, participants will learn what a leader's role is in ensuring positive intergenerational relations, including how to prepare for and tackle pain points specific to nonprofits, and strategies for staying on track.

Part IV: Building & Sustaining a Healthy Multi-Generational Culture
October 15, 1:00-2:30 PM ET

In this fourth and final session, attendees will learn about common signs - even among high performers - of intergenerational tension and how they most commonly show up in nonprofit culture. They will examine different communication channels and styles and learn how they can create a culture of fear, distrust, or hostility. Participants will learn how to trace poor or nonexistent intergenerational communication back to cultural shortcomings and the most effective way(s) to address those issues at the root. Attendees will "diagnose" the culture within their own department, team, or organization, and work in groups to identify ways in which leadership behavior is influencing the perpetuation of both good and bad habits.

Each 90-minute training session will be fully interactive, with multiple opportunities for open discussion, as well as a minimum of two breakout (small group) sessions, a minimum of one solo activity, a minimum of two polls, and follow-up materials (quizzes and/or feedback forms) to solidify learning and open doors for continued discussion. Participants will have the opportunity to anonymously pose questions following the training.

Our Presenter:

KATE VIANA is Founder & Principal of Nontoxic Nonprofits which works with small and mid-size nonprofit organizations to identify, address, and eliminate organizational toxicity. Her work in nonprofit communications and marketing spans over a decade and includes a focus on remedying communication breakdowns and cultural toxicity and improving intergenerational communications. She has worked with dozens of nonprofit organizations and causes, from healthcare and tourism to child welfare and animal rescue. Kate is a National Association of Nonprofit Organizations & Executives (NANOE) Certified Nonprofit Consultant and holds a BA in International Studies, an MA in Global Communication, and a professional Certificate of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

How to choose your stream:
ENGO representatives may self-select from the three workshop tracks based on their previous learning experiences with decolonization content.

Introduction to Decolonization in the ENGO Sector is designed for first-time learners and those with limited comfort exploring the Session topics. Sessions will be lecture-style making limited space for group discussion. Breakout rooms will be used intermittently to encourage first-time learners to practice discussing topics and gain confident understanding of materials.

Advanced Decolonial Theory and Application is designed for ENGO representatives who have experience with session topics and are ready to take chances by participating in potentially uncomfortable conversations to expose the root issues at play. These spaces are designed with safety of participants in mind with the goal of exposing the potential reproduction of colonial thinking/doing within the ENGO sector. Sessions will be conversational while making use of lecture-style teaching.

For Indigenous Ears Only - A Space for Reflection and Action is designed for Indigenous people who work within the ENGO sector and seek to connect with others to discuss experiences and vision decolonial pathways forward. These session agendas will be co-developed with participants.
Register Intro

Introduction to Decolonization in the ENGO Sector

Thursdays, October 3, 10, 17, 24 (1-3:00 pm EST)

Session 1: Settler Colonialism 101

Introduce ENGO representatives to the fact that colonization is a structure and not an event. Identifies key ways that colonialism moves through individuals and organizations.

Session 2: Positionality

ENGO representatives learn how to articulate their social location within a settler colonial state, and in relation to potential Indigenous partners.

Session 3: Inherent Indigenous Governance 101

Introduce the fact that Indigenous nations have their own sources of political authority that they can (and do) draw on when addressing environmental issues. Examples provided.

Session 4: Building Better Relations

ENGO representatives will road test ways they can implement previous workshop key points to re-imagine partnerships with Indigenous nations.

Cost: $100 (or register 4 staff from the same organization for one stream and get the 5th registration free)

All registrants will be provided with a link to access the recordings and presentation slides for 60 days following each session.

Instructor:

Dr. Les Sabiston (Red River Métis) is from Aswahonanihk (Selkirk), Manitoba. Working at the intersections of political, legal, and medical anthropologies, as well as Indigenous Studies, Les’ work brings together critical social theories of colonialism, race, class, gender and sexuality with the political commitments of decolonization and aspirations of realizing alternative worlds informed by Indigenous futures. A guiding principle to his work has been to develop a more robust understanding of the ongoing process of encounter with Indigenous peoples in Canada, that is, how the state and its people interact with and understand themselves in relation to the original peoples of this land.

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Register Advanced

Advanced Decolonial Theory and Application

Wednesdays, October 16, 23, 30, November 6 (1-3 pm EST)

Session 1:  Diagnosing Settler Colonialism in the Enviro Sector

Participants will be asked to share ways in which they have diagnosed and traced power in social justice movements and/or in the ENGO sector. This workshop will make space for discomfort as part of promoting decolonization.

Session 2: Inherent Indigenous Governance

A mix of advanced and introductory theory, this workshop delves into legal and political pluralism, naming the fact that Indigenous nations have their own sources of political authority that they can (and do) draw on when addressing environmental issues.

Session 3: The Nonprofit Industrial Complex

ENGO participants are introduced to theories and examples describing the Nonprofit Industrial Complex and the “Shadow State.” Purpose is to show how settler colonialism structures civil society.

Session 4: Decolonizing ENGO-First Nation Partnerships

This workshop delves deep into how ENGOs can partner with Indigenous nations beyond the Nonprofit Industrial Complex while promoting deference to inherent Indigenous political leaders.

Cost: $100 (or register 4 staff from the same organization for one stream and get the 5th registration free)

All registrants will be provided with a link to access the recordings and presentation slides for 60 days following each session.

Instructor:

Dr. Damien Lee is a member of Fort William First Nation and holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies from the University of Manitoba, and a Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance from the University of Victoria. Dr. Lee has extensive experience facilitating/teaching adult-focused education at the post-secondary level and co-leads Gimiwan Research and Consulting. They serve mainly Indigenous communities and Indigenous-led organizations by providing research and workshop services based in decolonial ethics and Indigenous worldviews.
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Register IEO

For Indigenous Ears Only - A Space for Reflection and Action

Tuesdays, October 22, 29, November 5, 12 (1-3 pm EST)

The Indigenous only space will be collaborative in nature but critical in approach. This track is a space for Indigenous folks within the ENGO sector to come together to discuss their experiences and work, with an eye to taking a position on what the sector might need to do in order to promote decolonization. Participants will use the first session to define our goals for the remaining three meetings. Therefore, session topics named here are proposals only.

Session 1:  Naming the Cannibal: Settler Colonialism in the ENGO Sector

Session 2: Proposed topic: Reflections on working in the ENGO Sector

Session 3: Proposed topic: Centering Indigenous Thought in the ENGO Sector

Session 4: Proposed topic: Visioning a Decolonial Environmental Sector

Cost: Free

Instructor:

Dr. Damien Lee is a member of Fort William First Nation and holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies from the University of Manitoba, and a Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance from the University of Victoria. Dr. Lee has extensive experience facilitating/teaching adult-focused education at the post-secondary level and co-leads Gimiwan Research and Consulting. They serve mainly Indigenous communities and Indigenous-led organizations by providing research and workshop services based in decolonial ethics and Indigenous worldviews.
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